An analysis of emotions and sorrows in the village blacksmith by henry wadsworth longfellow

His works are still regularly anthologised after nearly a century and a half. Read More Considered by many to be the most popular American poet of the 19th century, a storyteller, whose works are still cited - or parodied. Longfellow's works ranged from sentimental pieces such as 'The Village Blacksmith' to translations of Dante.

An analysis of emotions and sorrows in the village blacksmith by henry wadsworth longfellow

Previous Next The Village Blacksmith: He is a poet who acts often as a preacher always telling us which way to go in life.

However, if you are a student of literature, you must have read the Psalms of Life by this great poet Longfellow. One is religion and morality and another is, to a very great extent, no lesser than that!

And today, I am taking some time out of my busy schedule to write for kids — the kids of secondary and higher secondary classes who have to study on of the finest poems of Longfellow — The Village Blacksmith.

I will be writing the summary as well as detailed analysis of the poem so that the students might follow what the great poet tried to hint through his poem. Under a spreading chestnut-tree The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands; And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands.

These lines mean what you are seeing in the lines. The poet talks about a person, the blacksmith of course, who is strong and he is standing under the chestnut tree.

His hands are stronger than usual and the poet uses a simile to compare his hands to iron bands in the last line. In the second stanza, Longfellow gives us a further description of the person blacksmith. He tells us that the blacksmith has long, black and crisp hairs.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Poetry: American Poets Analysis

The next thing is his face which is tan brownish. After the first two lines, the next four lines are very important with respect to the meanings and connotations. He does not borrow from anyone because he earns as per his capacity and does not demand more.

He is not greedy! And a person who does not owe to anyone can live a life happy and glee! Week in, week out, from morn till night, You can hear his bellows blow; You can hear him swing his heavy sledge, With measured beat and slow, Like a sexton ringing the village bell, When the evening sun is low.

The sounds of his sledge sound like the village bell. A person can always hear his bellows the set-up to heat the iron to be able to forge it. And this goes on every day… And children coming home from school Look in at the open door; They love to see the flaming forge, And hear the bellows roar, And catch the burning sparks that fly Like chaff from a threshing-floor.

The Village Blacksmith - Wikipedia

Children love to see the bellows which produce sounds like roaring. Children also love to see the sparks which keep flying and produce a scene like the flying husks during the threshing procedure.

An analysis of emotions and sorrows in the village blacksmith by henry wadsworth longfellow

In this stanza, the poet is relaxed and he is telling us about the soft side in the heart of this strong blacksmith who goes to attend the church every Sunday with his family. And all this Sunday episode, the poet says, makes the blacksmith happy and satisfied! He needs must think of her once more, How in the grave she lies; And with his hard, rough hand he wipes A tear out of his eyes.

The poet continues the stanza from where he left off in the last one. Longfellow tells us that the Blacksmith feels that the voice of his daughter is just like her mother — his wife who has died as if she is singing in the heaven.

The blacksmith thinks about his wife in the grave and tears flow out of his eyes. In these lines, the poet seems to suggest that the outlook of the blacksmith is hardened but he owns a soft heart which has emotions!

This stanza and the last one after it are very important. As I told earlier, Longfellow is a person who is a poet as well as a preacher who always tends to tell us the right path to go ahead. The blacksmith spends his life working hard, being happy and being sad at times. He keeps moving ahead in his life as each morning he starts something new and ends it with the evening.

Every day he works and every night he rests fully. The hard work he does in the morning gives him the sleep of calm in the night. The blacksmith, to the poet, is an ideal person!

The Village Blacksmith Summary by Henry Longfellow - Beaming Notes

Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend, For the lesson thou hast taught! Thus at the flaming forge of life Our fortunes must be wrought; Thus on its sounding anvil shaped Each burning deed and thought.Longfellow tells us that the Blacksmith feels that the voice of his daughter is just like her mother – his wife (who has died) as if she is singing in the heaven.

The blacksmith thinks about his wife in the grave and tears flow out of his eyes.

An analysis of emotions and sorrows in the village blacksmith by henry wadsworth longfellow

He wipes the tears with his ‘hard and rough’ hands. Literary Analysis: The Rainy Day by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - Siddiqui Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “Rainy Day” uses the themes of lost and renewed hope, youth and grief to show how much our past and future experiences affect our lives and how though we .

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was born on February 17, , in Portland, Maine, and died on March 24, , in Cambridge, Massachusetts (Wagenknecht 1, 11).

A happy, polite child, Longfellow began his education when he was three years old at an old-fashioned private school. Romanticism Seen in Some Poems of Henry Wardsworth Longfellow Indrani Dewi Anggraini. Introduction. The title of the paper suggests that there are romantic features in Longfellow's poems.

Nevertheless, Longfellow is regarded a Puritan poet by Cecil B. Williams (). Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “The Village Blacksmith” emphasizes how the life and work of a common working man can provide an example of persistence and accomplishment in spite of trials and.

Literary Analysis of the poem "Hymn to the Night", by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, applying the "New Criticism" approach. Imagery: The imagery of the hymn is very rich and diverse. Longfellow uses a lot of personifications, similes, metaphors, and other literary figures to create the aesthetic atmosphere of .

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - Poetry & Biography of the Famous poet - All Poetry